**CSE 127: Computer Security** [*Deian Stefan*](https://cseweb.ucsd.edu/~dstefan/) **The online, bad-haircut version** About ============================================================== This course focuses on computer security, covering a wide range of topics on both the _defensive_ and _offensive_ side of this field. Among these will be systems security and exploitation (e.g., buffer overflows and return-oriented programming), sandboxing and isolation, covert channels, network security, language-based security, cryptography, privacy and anonymity. The goal of the course is to provide an appreciation of how to think adversarially with respect to computer systems as well as an appreciation of how to reason about attacks and defenses. To complete the projects in this course, you will need to be able to write code in C and (some) C++, and have some understanding of x86 assembly, JavaScript, PHP and SQL. We will not teach these in lecture; you are expected to learn them on your own or ask for help in section or office hours. If you don't know C, K&R's [The C Programming Language](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_C_Programming_Language) is a go to, but the [Hacking](https://nostarch.com/hacking2.htm) book is probably enough and covers x86 assembly and many of the topics in this class. Class details ============================================================== Lectures: : Monday and Wednesday, 5:00--6:20 PM PDT Staff: : **Instructor**: Deian Stefan : **Teaching Assistants**: Sunjay Cauligi, Evan Johnson, Sam Liu, and Kevin Yu Section: : Monday, 11:00-11:50 AM PDT Office hours: : **Evan**: Monday, 7:00-8:00 PM PDT : **Sam**: Tuesday, 1:00-2:00 PM PDT : **Kevin**: Wednesday, 10:00-11 AM PDT : **Sunjay**: Thursday, 7:00-8:00 PM PDT : **Deian**: Friday, 9:00-10:00 AM PDT Web tools: : [Piazza](https://piazza.com/ucsd/fall2020/cse127) for all communication. ([Configure your piazza privacy settings](https://piazza.com/myprofile).) : [Gradescope](https://www.gradescope.com/courses/195955) (entry code: KY5K8Z) for assignments and exam. : [Zoom (via Canvas)](https://canvas.ucsd.edu/courses/18853) for lecture, section, and all office hours. Calendar and readings ============================================================== Mon Oct 5 2020: Introduction - [*Slides*](slides/1-introduction.pdf) - *Read*: [This World of Ours](https://www.usenix.org/system/files/1401_08-12_mickens.pdf) by James Mickens - *Watch*: [USENIX Security 2018 Keynote](https://www.usenix.org/conference/usenixsecurity18/presentation/mickens) by James Mickens Tue Oct 6 2020: [PA1: GDB + x86](pa/pa1.html) - *Early turn-in:* Monday, October 12, 2020 by 23:59:59 PDT (10% bonus) - *Hard deadline:* Wednesday, October 14, 2020 by 23:59:59 PDT Wed Oct 7 2020: Buffer overflow attacks - [*Slides*](slides/2-bufferoverflows.pdf) - [*GDB buffer overflow notes*](notes/bufferoverflow.html) - *Read*: [Smashing the Stack for Fun and Profit](http://phrack.org/issues/49/14.html#article) by Aleph One - *Optional:* 0x300-0x320 from [Hacking](https://nostarch.com/hacking2.htm). 0x200-0x270 if you don't have a strong C background. - *Resources mentioned in class:* [Project Zero exploits](https://googleprojectzero.blogspot.com/2020/07/mms-exploit-part-1-introduction-to-qmage.html), [finger daemon](https://minnie.tuhs.org/cgi-bin/utree.pl?file=4.3BSD/usr/src/etc/fingerd.c), [GEF](https://gef.readthedocs.io/en/master/), [Compiler explorer](https://godbolt.org/z/3iFhjy) Mon Oct 12 2020: Buffer overflow defenses - [*Slides*](slides/3-lowlevelmitigations.pdf) - *Read*: [ASLR](https://pax.grsecurity.net/docs/aslr.txt) and [NOEXEC](https://pax.grsecurity.net/docs/noexec.txt) Tue Oct 13 2020: [PA2: Buffer overflows](pa/pa2.html) Wed Oct 14 2020: Memory (un)safety - [*Slides*](slides/4-ropcfi.pdf) - *Read*: [Low-Level Software Security by Example](papers/erlingsson:low.pdf) by Ulfar Erlingsson et al. - *Optional*: [The Geometry of Innocent Flesh on the Bone: Return-into-libc without Function Calls (on the x86)](papers/shacham:rop.pdf) by Hovav Shacham, [Hacking Blind](papers/bittau:brop.pdf) by Andrea Bittau et al., and [Control-Flow Integrity](papers/abadi:cfi.pdf) by Martin Abadi et al. Mon Oct 19 2020: More memory (un)safety - [*Slides*](slides/5-heapint.pdf), [*Example code*](notes/heap) - *Read*: [Understanding glibc malloc](https://sploitfun.wordpress.com/2015/02/10/understanding-glibc-malloc/) by sploitfun - *Optional*: [Advanced Doug lea's malloc exploits](http://phrack.org/issues/61/6.html) by jp, [Automatic Techniques to Systematically Discover New Heap Exploitation Primitives](https://www.usenix.org/conference/usenixsecurity20/presentation/yun) by Insu Yun et al. Wed Oct 21 2020: Bugfinding - Co-instructor: [Fraser Brown](https://web.stanford.edu/~mlfbrown/) - *Read*: [A Few Billion Lines of Code Later: Using Static Analysis to Find Bugs in the Real World](papers/bessey:a-few.pdf) by Al Bessey et al. Mon Oct 26 2020: Sandboxing and isolation - *Read*: [The Road to Less Trusted Code: Lowering the Barrier to In-process Sandboxing](https://cseweb.ucsd.edu/~dstefan/noindex/login2020/) by Garfinkel et al. - *Optional*: [Retrofitting Fine Grain Isolation in the Firefox Renderer](https://cseweb.ucsd.edu/~dstefan/pubs/narayan:2020:rlbox.pdf) by Narayan et al. Tue Oct 27 2020: PA3: Sandboxing Wed Oct 28 2020: Side channels - Co-instructor: [Sunjay Cauligi](https://www.sysnet.ucsd.edu/~scauligi/) - *Read*: [Efficient Cache Attacks on AES, and Countermeasures](papers/tromer:cache.pdf) by Eram Tromer et al. - *Optional*: [Chapter 19](https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rja14/Papers/SEv3-ch19-7sep.pdf) of Security Engineering Mon Nov 2 2020: Web intro Tue Nov 3 2020: PA4: Side channels - Vote (if you can and haven't voted already) - *Watch*: [USENIX Security 2020 Panel on Voting](https://www.usenix.org/conference/usenixsecurity20/presentation/panel-voting) Wed Nov 4 2020: Web attacks and defenses Mon Nov 9 2020: Modern client-side web defenses Tue Nov 10 2020: PA5: Web Wed Nov 11 2020: Network intro Mon Nov 16 2020: No class Tue Nov 17 2020: PA6: Networking Wed Nov 18 2020: Network attacks Mon Nov 23 2020: Network defenses Wed Nov 25 2020: Symmetric-key crypto - *Read*: [Chapter 5](https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rja14/Papers/SEv3-ch5-7sep.pdf) (skip 5.2.3, 5.2.5, 5.3.4, 5.3.5, 5.4, 5.7, 5.8) of Security Engineering Thu Nov 26 2020: PA7: Crypto Mon Nov 30 2020: Public-key crypto - *Read*: Sections 5.2.5, 5.3.4, 5.3.5, 5.7, 5.8 of Security Engineering - *Read*: [Bleichenbacher's RSA signature forgery based on implementation error](https://mailarchive.ietf.org/arch/msg/openpgp/5rnE9ZRN1AokBVj3VqblGlP63QE/) by Hal Finney Wed Dec 2 2020: TLS, PKI, and CT Thu Dec 3 2020: PA8: TLS Mon Dec 7 2020: More TLS, PKI, and CT Wed Dec 9 2020: Privacy, anonymity, and ethics - *Watch*: [Crypto 2020 Invited talk](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ygq9ci0GFhA) by Seny Kamara - *Read*: [Chapter 26](https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rja14/Papers/SEv3-ch26-7sep.pdf) of Security Engineering - *Optional*: [Chapter 20](https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rja14/Papers/SEv3-ch20-7sep.pdf) (skip 20.5-20.7) of Security Engineering Mon Dec 17 2020: Final exam Textbook ============================================================== We will occasionally be assigning readings from Ross Anderson's [Security Engineering](https://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~rja14/book.html) and various other online resources and research papers. We may also assign optional reading from Jon Erickson's [Hacking: The Art of Exploitation](https://nostarch.com/hacking2.htm). Evaluation and grading ============================================================== Beyond lectures, we will reinforce concepts and explore new ones via programming assignments, a final exam, and online discussions. Each of these will be used towards your final grade, as further described below. Programming assignments (80%) ----------------------- We will have eight programming assignments. These assignments are meant to both reinforce your knowledge of the concepts covered in lecture and get you to think about security in more depth, beyond what is covered lecture. You are expected to work on the assignments by yourself. You may discuss the assignments with students from the course---in general--but not any specific solution. There are no late days, but you will receive an additional 10% if you turn in your assignment by the early date. If you consult anything (books, academic papers, internet resources, people) when working on the assignments, note this in your submission. We encourage outside learning but expect you to not seek out specific details about a solution---anything submitted should be considered your own work. Similarly, you are expected to not publish or otherwise share your solutions at any point (even after the class is over). If you are unsure about what is allowed, please ask the course staff. Exam (15%) ----------------------- The final exam will be used (1) to revisit core concepts at the end of the quarter and (2) apply your knowledge in new settings. The final exam will be open for 24 hours (though it should only take you 1-3 hours). The exam is open notes and open book. You are allowed to use the web, but not permitted to collaborate. Participation (5% + 10% bonus) ----------------------- We will assign readings with most lectures. You are expected to have a vague understanding of the concepts that will be discussed in class. This will allow us to spend the lecture time to solidify your understanding. But we recommend re-reading after class as well. Asking and answering questions in lecture, on Piazza, or during office hours counts towards your class participation. Starting discussions (e.g., around the readings) online also counts is encouraged! **Bonus: Lecture notes** We hope to develop written notes that can be used in future versions of this class. If you summarize lectures into self-contained, well-written notes you can earn up to 10% extra credit. If you do a very good job, we will try to hire you after this quarter to continue working on these notes. Academic integrity and student conduct ============================================================== By taking this course, you implicitly agree to abide by the UCSD policies on [Integrity of Scholarship](https://senate.ucsd.edu/Operating-Procedures/Senate-Manual/appendices/2) and [Student Conduct](https://students.ucsd.edu/sponsor/student-conduct/). See the [Academic Integrity Support for Remote Learning](https://academicintegrity.ucsd.edu/take-action/covid-19-students.html). University rules on integrity of scholarship and code of conduct are taken seriously and will be enforced. Acknowledgements ============================================================== The course structure and many of the ideas and slides are influenced or directly from other courses taught at Berkeley ([David Wagner](https://people.eecs.berkeley.edu/~daw/) and [Raluca Popa](https://people.eecs.berkeley.edu/~raluca/)), Oberlin ([Stephen Checkoway](https://checkoway.net/)), Stanford ([Dan Boneh](https://crypto.stanford.edu/~dabo/), [John Mitchell](https://theory.stanford.edu/people/jcm/), and [Zakir Durumeric](https://zakird.com)), UT Austin ([Hovav Shacham](https://www.cs.utexas.edu/directory/hovav-shacham)), UCSD ([Stefan Savage](https://cseweb.ucsd.edu/~savage/), [Nadia Heninger](https://cseweb.ucsd.edu/~nadiah/)) and UIUC ([Kirill Levchenko](https://klevchen.ece.illinois.edu/)). If we missed anybody please let us know!